Caregivers Find Much-Needed Information And Support Through ‘Huddol’

When her mother needed to transition to a higher level of care, Donna Thomson reached out to Huddol members for advice on housing and care options in Montreal. After co-caregiving for his aging parents, Rick Lauber joined Huddol to share what he had learned with other caregivers. Huddol is the country’s first cross-disease, cross-platform, bilingual collaborative network that aims to...

Wearable Technology Gives New Hope For Regaining Mobility After Strokes and Spinal Cord Injuries

Researchers at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute are testing new wearable technology that could “reawaken” muscles of people with paralysis from neurological problems, such as strokes or spinal cord injuries. The shirts and pants will deliver functional electrical stimulation (FES); brief, low-intensity electrical impulses that stimulate neural pathways and generate muscle contraction. The technology could improve motor function, including the ability...

Want To Age In The Healthiest Way Possible? You’ve Got To Move It or Lose It And Exercise

Ten years into retirement, Patricia Skidmore is still in awe of her ability to make change and lead an active life. Her outlook wasn’t always so hopeful. In her 50s, Skidmore, professor emeritus, Brescia College at the University of Western Ontario, was riddled with pain and resigned to hip replacement or back surgery. “I thought I was headed for a...

At-Home Testing To Diagnose Dementia In Early Stages Is On The Horizon

With dementia rates rising sharply in Canada and around the world, it’s not surprising that researchers have been focusing on ways to spot the condition earlier. Globally, someone is diagnosed with dementia every three seconds and there are 10 million new cases each year – truly alarming statistics. At-home tests have become increasingly popular. One of the latest to be...

CAMH Experts Shine A Light on Promoting Mental Health In Later Years

In this Q&A with CAMH's leading experts in late-life mental health, we explore the mental health concerns that affect older Canadians and how CAMH researchers are addressing these issues. Dr. Bruce G. Pollock heads all aspects of CAMH’s research as vice president of research. He has been newly named as the inaugural Peter and Shelagh Godsoe Chair in Late-Life Mental Health...

Research Challenges Longstanding Classifications of Diabetes With the Discovery of Five Unique Types

According to data from the World Health Organization, the number of people with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980. The condition is predicted to become the seventh leading cause of death worldwide by 2030. Up until recently, the understanding and approaches to management of the disease has rested upon its classification into two types. Type 1 is an autoimmune condition...

Shining a Light on the Unique Health Issues of Menopausal Women

Too often, the unique health issues of aging women are overlooked. An estimated five million women are of menopausal age in Canada. As the population ages, the need for specialized care will continue to grow. To address the challenge, the Mount Sinai’s Mature Women’s Health Program in Toronto is celebrating a $2 million dollar funding milestone, which will be used to...

Another Stereotype Shattered! Yes, Happiness Does Increase With Age

Legendary singer Patti LaBelle nailed it when she said: “Here’s what I know: I’m a better person at 50 than I was at 48 … and better at 52 than I was at 50. I’m calmer, easier to live with. All this stuff is in my soul forever.” Sandra Anderson, a newly minted empty nester in Ottawa, feels the same:...

Break Myths, Not Bones: Why Understanding Osteoporosis Is Critical For Healthy Aging

Bone health is a cornerstone of good health. Yet it’s not something we give much thought to until it is too late and suffer a fracture. Myths endure around osteoporosis, preventing us from making good nutrition and smart lifestyle choices to keep the disease at bay. Not being cognizant of the role bone health plays in being able to age...

Osteoporosis Is A Men’s Disease, Too: What An Expert Has To Say

“Osteoporosis is the silent disease,” says Dr. Aliya Khan, professor of Clinical Medicine, Endocrinology, Metabolism and Geriatrics at McMaster University. “We also call osteoporosis the ‘silent thief’ because it can destroy a person’s bone structure – wreaking havoc on their overall health and vitality – with little warning. While it’s often considered a woman’s disease, osteoporosis also steals the...